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July 2021

Salt lake city

The future of downtown Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is booming and consistently tops lists of the best places to live and work.

“We’re really not missing out on much,” said Karen Bow of Visit Salt Lake. “Salt Lake is one of the few destinations our size with a professional symphony, professional opera, professional ballet.”

Bow promotes Utah’s capital to the rest of the world, claiming Salt Lake is a modern mountainous center of the west.

With a massive new convention center hotel on the way and a vast array of residential and commercial construction projects, the city is changing and evolving.

But is it for the best?

FOX 13’s Kelly Chapman spent an afternoon in Salt Lake City asking residents and business owners what it would take to build a better city. The answers were varied.

Shamus Funk has said he would like more things for the kids to do, Lara Miller wants more parks and gathering places to connect with locals, and Jordan Hollman would like a stronger cultural scene.

“It’s easy to say, a lot harder to implement, but a more booming art scene and not just, like, fine art,” Hollman said.

Nick Norris, the planning director of Salt Lake City, says that in addition to affordable housing, the city needs a green loop, that is, parks along the downtown area where there are has a lot of density, but open spaces are hard to find.

And while city officials tackle big issues, some local small business owners feel they’ve been left out of the planning.

Ken Sanders Rare Books is a unique store that has taken up residence in Salt Lake, but they feel like they’ve been kicked out.

“You look out the front door of my bookstore and you can see six building cranes going up. Ten stories, 20 stories, 31 stories across the street… and then we’re next, ”said store owner Ken Sanders.

Sanders has exhibited his collection of books and artwork in the same building for the past 20 years and said a corporate investor was considering demolishing the building to replace it with a skyscraper, but he didn’t. leaving nowhere to go with dwindling location options and rents skyrocketing.

Matt Caputo, the owner of Caputo’s Deli, a well-known deli on the west side of Salt Lake, would like to see more attention and detail to the architecture and city laws that will allow restaurants and bars to shop. alcohol at wholesale prices to inaugurate more catering establishments.

Caputo brings up an additional point that he says requires not only the immediate attention of lawmakers, but every Utahn.

“One thing to make our city a better city is to really take clean air seriously,” he said.

Watch the video above to learn more about this detailed 360 report.


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Utah economy

Google, industry experts push back Play Store lawsuit by Utah AG

In a political landscape that continues to shake partisan bickering and hostility in Utah and across the country, finding even a small patch of common ground is an increasingly distant prospect.

But a new survey from Pew Research has found that the reddest Republicans and the bluest Democrats share a bogeyman they all would like to see curbed.

Large American technology companies.

And it’s a meme that hasn’t been missed by elected officials on both sides of the aisle who are engaged, at the highest level ever, in efforts to address perceived issues with driving America’s tech companies across. a torrent of regulations, legislation and legal efforts.

Utah is playing an outsized role in a few of these proceedings, including a handful of federal lawsuits that have put some of the biggest tech platforms in the crosshairs.

Earlier this month, Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes announced that his office is co-leading a new lawsuit targeting Google and its alleged anti-competitive practices in the way the company runs its Play Store, the first distributor of applications for phones running on another Google. product, the Android operating system.

The action marks the third multi-state lawsuit that includes Utah among plaintiffs trying to take on major U.S. tech companies for alleged abuses of market dominance. The other cases are against Facebook and another Google lawsuit that focuses on the company’s search functions. While a federal judge dismissed the complaint against Facebook last month, the case is still ongoing and could resume if an amended complaint is filed. Reyes has not been able to cite the costs of the various lawsuits so far, but said it was likely “hundreds of thousands” of dollars.

Reyes said Google is scamming consumers and small businesses by charging unfair commissions, in some cases up to 30%, on things like in-app purchases and upgrades for popular games.

“Google is using its hyper-dominant position in the market to illegally mine additional billions of dollars from small businesses and consumers,” Reyes said at a press briefing. “We believe these are monopoly actions that need to be dealt with immediately.”

Reyes said his office has heard numerous complaints from consumers in Utah, businesses in Utah and businesses out of state about the impacts of Google’s fees, which he says exceed by far more market-oriented commission rates of 2% to 3% charged by others, but smaller. , application distributors. He also called the company for manipulating the Android system to malfunction when running programs sold outside of Google Play, also sometimes referred to as the Play Store, forcing developers to follow Google’s rules.

Google says the claims are wrong and that Google Play operates in a more open fashion than its competitors and chooses not to “impose the same restrictions as other mobile operating systems.”

In a blog post published on July 7, the day the new lawsuit was filed, Wilson White, senior director of public policy at Google, wrote that Google Play operates in an environment teeming with competitors, including some like the Apple’s App Store that surpasses it when it comes to revenue.

“So it’s strange that a group of state attorneys general have chosen to take legal action to attack a system that offers more openness and choice than others,” White wrote. “This complaint mimics an equally unfounded lawsuit filed by big app developer Epic Games, which took advantage of Android’s opening up by distributing its Fortnite app outside of Google Play.”

It should be noted that since the publication of this blog entry, Epic Games’ federal lawsuit against Google has joined the action that Utah is co-leading.

James Czerniawski, Technology and innovation policy analyst at the Utah-based libertarian think tank Libertas Institute, also sees issues with the latest filing against Google, which includes around 30 state attorneys general as co – Complainants from Utah.

A closer look at the overall app vendor market, Czerniawski said, shows that some of the claims on file, including outsized commission rates, just don’t hold up.

“The 30% commission, despite AG Reyes’ claim, is not anti-competitive,” Czerniawski said in a statement. “It’s actually within the perfectly normal range for what you would expect from a store. Whether you look at Valve’s Steam Store, Sony’s Playstation Store, Microsoft’s Store for Xbox (even their Windows Store for PC until recently), Amazon, and Samsung’s Galaxy Store, the commission rates are all in. this range of 20 to 30%.

“It’s also worth noting that Google, Apple and Microsoft have all announced some form of commission rate policy adjustment. This puts downward pressure on this 30% commission rate and it would not be surprising if this top rate decreases in the future. “

Czerniawski also noted that Reyes and his co-plaintiffs should not be so quick to dismiss the legal reasoning behind the Federal Court’s dismissal of the Facebook complaint.

“While Attorney General Reyes is correct in determining that the FTC and States’ outcome against Facebook does not necessarily have a direct impact on his ongoing litigation in this case or others, as these cases involve different issues, it’s not necessarily in the clear either, “Czerniawski said.” The FTC lost to Facebook in part because the federal judge correctly identified that the FTC and state AGs did not succeeded in demonstrating real evidence that was legally sufficient to justify their complaint of antitrust violations.

“The reason that matters for this litigation and other ongoing litigation is that Attorney General Reyes and others will have to do a much better job of demonstrating the harm to consumers if they are to have these cases taken seriously by a court.”

Czerniawski said he keeps a rough tally of federal legislative activity focused on the conduct of U.S. technology platforms and noted dozens of proposals currently focused on the rules that govern the management of social media, such as the article 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996, or amendments to existing federal antitrust regulations.

While the data collected in the new Pew report focused on respondents’ feelings about social media platforms, it provides further evidence that consumers, regardless of their political affiliation, mostly harbor bad feelings about social media. About the conduct of large technology companies.

In a survey conducted in late June that included responses from more than 4,700 American adults, Pew found Americans mostly suspicious of how big tech companies work.

“A majority of Americans think social media companies have too much power and influence in politics, and about half think big tech companies should be regulated more than they are now,” it read. in the report, which comes as four top tech executives prepare to testify ahead of Congress about their businesses’ role in the economy and society.

While the majority of Republicans and Democrats in the survey expressed qualms about social media platforms, Pew’s data also reflects some differences among party members.

The report found that “about 8 in 10 Republicans and Independents of Republican leanings (82%) think these companies have too much power and influence in politics, compared to 63% of Democrats and Democrats. Democrats, on the other hand, are more likely than Republicans to say that these companies have about the right amount of power and influence in politics (28% vs. 13%). Small actions on both sides believe that these companies do not have enough power. “

A Utah-specific poll in February this year also revealed broad skepticism of tech companies and a similar partisan difference with Beehive State Republicans who are more cynical than their Democratic neighbors.

For its part in the latest legal activity, Google claims that the vast majority of app sellers pay no commission and point the finger at big developers as the source from which the grievances arise.

“This lawsuit is not about helping the little guy or protecting consumers,” White wrote in his blog post in response to the Google Play lawsuit. “It’s about stimulating a handful of major app developers who want to enjoy the benefits of Google Play without paying for it.

“This risks increasing costs for small developers, hampering their ability to innovate and compete, and make apps in the Android ecosystem less secure for consumers. ”

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Salt lakes real estate

These are some of the most racially diverse second home markets to consider

This article is reproduced with permission from The escape house, a newsletter for secondary owners and those who want to be. Subscribe here. © 2021. All rights reserved.

Many of the nation’s well-known second home destinations – think Nantucket, Cape Cod, East Hampton – aren’t exactly known for their diversity. But what if it’s something that’s important to you as a potential buyer?

The Escape Home worked with Redfin to identify which second home markets in the United States are the most diverse. The real estate company determined the metropolitan areas with the highest number of non-white second home owners using the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act to extract data on census racial makeup and second home mortgages.

Here’s what Danielle Hyams from The Escape Home found:

Pine Bluff, Arkansas

64.71% of owners of second homes are not white.

Wikimedia Commons


Pine Bluff is full of year-round outdoor activities, like kayaking along the world’s longest bayou, which stretches 364 miles into Louisiana. It is a historically rich place with serious civil rights credentials and deep ties to the worlds of jazz, blues and gospel music.

Realtor.com


On the market: This charming four bedroom, three and a half bath home is listed at $ 184,900.

Rocky Mount, North Carolina

64.29% of second home owners are not white.

@historicrockymountnc


Located in East Carolina, Rocky Mount is a charming town with a promising food scene as well as plenty of local wineries and craft breweries. The town is located along the Tar River and it is possible to go kayaking in the town center.

Realtor.com


On the market: This four bedroom, two and a half bath home features an inground pool and is listed at $ 279,900.

San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles, California

31.99% of second home owners are not white.

@slocal


Welcome to the land of wine! Located midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, the area offers residents a laid-back California vibe, close to plenty of beaches and hot springs, and a burgeoning food scene. And of course, lots and lots of good wine; there are hundreds of cellars.

Realtor.com


On the market: This historic four bedroom, two and a half bath house built in 1890 is listed at $ 1.25 million.

Farmington, New Mexico

38.55% of second home owners are not white.

@ terry.rowe


It’s the city of choice for outdoor enthusiasts: Located in the San Juan River Valley, Farmington is in the heart of the Four Corners region, which includes Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New -Mexico, and offers easy access to three rivers, five lakes and six national parks. Native American tradition remains strong in the area, and there are many art galleries, museums, and trading posts in the historic downtown area.

Realtor.com


On the market: This five-bedroom, four-bathroom desert-style home is listed at $ 410,000.

Savannah, Georgia

31.35% of owners of second homes are not white.

@whattodoinsavannah


This charming coastal town, located along the Savannah River, is known for its parks, architecture and vibrant history, and is just a 50-minute drive from Hilton Head Island.

Realtor.com


On the market: This three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath waterfront home is listed at $ 1.28 million and has the most breathtaking porch.

Virginia Beach, Virginia

36.15% of owners of second homes are not white.

@visitvabeach


Known for its beaches and boardwalk, Virginia Beach is also home to one of the last great salt marsh habitats on the East Coast, which boasts hundreds of miles of inland water and thousands of acres of parkland.

Realtor.com


On the market: This three bedroom, three and a half bath home located just steps from the beach is listed at $ 639,900.

This article is reproduced with permission from The escape house, a newsletter for secondary owners and those who want to be. Subscribe here. © 2021. All rights reserved.


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Salt lake city

This is where Utah ranks in drug overdose deaths in 2020

2021-07-22

More than 93,000 people died from drug overdoses in the United States in 2020, an increase of almost 30% from 2019 and the most on record in a single year, according to recently released data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Drug addiction experts say the increase in overdose deaths is largely due to the increased presence of the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl in the United States. Other contributors include issues related to the coronavirus pandemic, such as increased isolation and job losses.

Utah is the state with the 17th lowest number of drug overdose deaths per capita in 2020. There were 19 fatal overdoses per 100,000, for a total of 622 drug overdose deaths.

Last year, most reported an increase in drug overdose deaths after seeing a decrease in deaths in 2019. In Utah, there were 18 fatal drug overdoses in the state per 100,000 population, for a total of 575, in 2019.

The average number of overdose deaths in Utah between 2015 and 2019 was 20 per 100,000 people per year, the 25th of all U.S. states, or an average of 630 overdose-related deaths per year.

To determine which states had the highest drug overdose death rates, 24/7 Wall St. looked at the CDC’s recently released preliminary estimates of drug overdose deaths. States are ranked by the number of drug-related deaths per 100,000 population. These are the states with the most drug overdose deaths per capita in 2020. These are the states with the most drug overdose deaths in 2020.


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Utah economy

How the Western “mega-drought” could cause more “water wars”

Brad Howard, CNBC Producer: Water is a crucial resource that all humans need.

Emma Newburger, CNBC Business News: And right now, what we’re seeing is that there just isn’t enough water for everyone.

Maddie Stone, Freelance Science Journalist: The current situation is that large swathes of the west – essentially all of California, Oregon, Nevada and Utah, and a few other states – are currently in a state of drought.

Kathryn Reed, Correspondent, North Bay Business Journal: It is really difficult to find a business that is not affected.

Brad Howard CNBC producer: Then, when the water runs out, the economy feels the effect.

Morgan Levy, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego: Agriculture consumes more than 70% of the available water supply. During years of drought, agriculture will consume an even larger fraction of water reserves.

Brad Howard CNBC Producer :: Tourism, landscaping, home building and farming are just a few of the businesses that are suffering due to one of the worst droughts the West Coast has ever seen. In 2020, forest fires and drought cost US $ 21 billion. With lower water levels and higher temperatures, the risk of forest fires increases, according to the National Environmental Information Centers. In the western climatic region alone, which includes California and Nevada, wildfires caused $ 12.1 billion in damage in 2020. With the fires, political feuds and climate change, water becomes more important than ever to the US economy.

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Salt lake city government

AM News Brief: Stargazing at Eagle Mountain, Parade Traffic in SLC and Smoky Air, and Exercise (everywhere)

Friday morning July 23, 2021

Northern Utah

Days of ’47 impacts the roads of downtown Salt Lake City

There are road closures in downtown Salt Lake City on Friday due to the Days of 47 parade and festivities. The Salt Lake City Police Department said the roads would be closed from 6 a.m. to around noon. The marathon and other races started at 5:30 a.m. Traffic may only cross intersections along the marathon route between runners; which includes Sunnyside, 1300 East and South Temple. Intersections will be fully closed along the parade route that begins at State and South Temple, heads south on 200 East, and turns on 900 South toward Liberty Park. UTA has increased TRAX and FrontRunner service before the parade begins at 9 a.m., but buses will run on Saturdays. – Elaine clark

Looking Up In Eagle Mountain

A new stargazing park is in the works at Eagle Mountain, Utah. The city announced Thursday that it is working with Utah Valley University and Facebook, which is giving the city a $ 250,000 grant for the project. The city plans to build an observatory and increase parking and toilets in the neighborhood. Officials said they were hopeful the new park would be designated as one of Utah’s Dark Sky sites. The construction schedule has not yet been determined. – Ross Terrell

Editor’s note: Facebook also supports KUER.

Southern Utah

Businesses struggle to find employees in Cedar City

Utah’s unemployment rate was the second lowest in the country last month, but businesses are struggling to find workers as the state’s economy rebounds from the pandemic. Shane Behunin owns All American Diner in Cedar City. He said it was one of the best years in terms of business – with everyone traveling and spending money. But he struggles to hire workers, even when he says he offers competitive wages and frequent bonuses. So now he’s spending more to have the employees work overtime just to keep the restaurant open. Toro Vaun owns Donuts Town in Cedar. He was looking for a baker, but said he was having a hard time keeping people around. Read the full story. – Lexi peery

Region / Nation

Home Secretary on drought strategies

US Home Secretary Deb Haaland said significant federal infrastructure investments were needed to protect existing water supplies. Haaland spoke Thursday at the start of a three-day visit to Colorado. His comments come as a historic drought grips the American West, and Haaland said all levels of government must work to reduce demand, including promoting water efficiency and recycling. She will also visit the new headquarters of the Bureau of Land Management in Grand Junction, which was moved from DC by the Trump administration in 2019.

Where there is smoke, there is air pollution

How too smoky is it to exercise outside? Boise State University environmental toxicologist Luke Montrose said it was essential to check the area’s Air Quality Index or AQI. From there, Montrose said the decision depended on factors like age or health risks, like asthma. He said the harder a person breathes, the shorter their exposure to poor air quality conditions should be. Everyone should definitely avoid going out when the AQI is above 200. In Utah, information is available at air.utah.gov. – Maggie Mullen, Mountain West Information Office


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Salt lake city

Visiting Greek Orthodox Archbishop meets Interfaith Council

The ties between Eastern and Western Christianity were fully visible on Tuesday when the head of the Greek Orthodox Church in America visited Utah’s top Roman Catholic leader.

Together, they – and representatives of the Salt Lake Interfaith Roundtable – emphasized the importance of dialogue and the need for interfaith unity.

The meeting was part of the visit to Salt Lake City by the Greek Orthodox Bishop Elpidophoros (Lambriniadis), the first trip to Utah by a Greek Orthodox archbishop since 2000, according to information from local Greek Orthodox leaders.

Tuesday evening’s reception was hosted by Bishop Oscar Solis, who leads more than 300,000 Roman Catholics in Utah, at the pastoral center of the Diocese of Salt Lake City.

The group subsequently toured downtown Salt Lake City. Madeleine Cathedral.

In his remarks to the Interfaith Roundtable, Elpidophoros underlined the meaning and impact of dialogue in interfaith relations.

The word “dialogue” in Greek generally refers to “an unusually diverse range of realities,” a definition which he says “resonates strongly” in an interfaith context.

“Dialogue becomes the key,” he said, “in which we are all called to dissolve our divisions, to heal hatred, to foster resilience, to fight against prejudices… [and] promote peace and reconciliation.

Elpidophoros said the Greek Orthodox Church recognizes differences but believes in cooperation and peace between religions. It really means listening to other points of view and accepting common values.

The real dialogue, Elpidophoros said, begins in families and communities.

“Make your faith, make your tradition richer,” he said. “Wealth comes from ecumenical values [of] listen to others [and] to receive all that is good.

Solis said Catholics follow Pope Francis’ advice in creating human relationships with people of all other faiths.

These relationships “define the course of our vision and our mission as a Catholic community,” he said. “We come from one God and we are all children of God. … and this is why we can easily see each other as brothers and sisters.

Muslim makes his own sacrifice

Elpidophoros especially thanked Zeynep Kariparduc, president of the Salt Lake City Interfaith Council and a Muslim woman, for attending the event when she could have celebrated Eid al-Adha, or the feast of sacrifice, with her family and friends.

As a native of Turkey, Elpidophoros said he understood the importance – indeed the sacrifice – of Kariparduc missing part of the Islamic holiday by several days.

He presented him with a silver medallion made in Istanbul that depicts Abraham or Ibrahim (a revered prophet in Christianity, Islam and Judaism) and his wife Sarah harboring three angels.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Archbishop Elpidophoros of America presents a medallion to Zeynep Kariparduc during a visit to the Cathedral of the Magdalen in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, July 20, 2021.

He also presented Solis with a silver cross made in Istanbul.

Kariparduc said people of different faiths should get to know each other so that they can better practice their own faith.

Tuesday night’s meeting was important, she said, because as religious leaders come to an agreement, so will their followers.

“Without the other, we cannot create a diverse society,” she said. “Religious leaders play a crucial role in establishing[ing] peaceful societies.

“Keeping our identity alive”

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune, Elpidophoros said it was important for him to visit every state and parish in the United States

In Salt Lake City, he said, there are two big parishes, “so we had to come.”

Although New York’s Greek Orthodox community is present across the country, Elpidophoros said these members have a lot in common with their brothers and sisters in Salt Lake City. Many of them have ancestors who came to the United States to pursue the American dream; they pray, go to school and participate in cultural events together.

“The church is for us always the place where we keep our identity alive”, he declared, “… [our] cultural, linguistic and religious identity.

At the same time, said Elpidophoros, each parish adapts to its state and community in different ways. That is why he wants to know first-hand the needs and expectations of each parish.

Other appointments await you

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Archbishop Elpidophoros of America and Bishop Oscar A. Solis meet at the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City on Tuesday, July 20, 2021.

This week’s historic visit to Elpidophoros comes as the Utahns mark the entry of Mormon pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley 174 years ago.

It is “a bit unprecedented” for an archbishop to visit a place for almost a week, the archbishop said. Rev. Archimandrite George Nikas, the presiding priest of the Great Salt Lake Greek Orthodox Church. “So we are very excited and very honored to have this happen.”

Throughout his visit, Elipidophoros met with a number of senior government and religious leaders.

He is scheduled to meet with Governor Spencer Cox on Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning with the ruling First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall. He is due to meet with Rep. Burgess Owens, R-Utah, on Saturday.

The Archbishop will also spend time in the Greek Orthodox churches of the Wasatch Front, including Holy Trinity Cathedral in downtown Salt Lake City, Prophet Elias in Holladay, St. Anna in Sandy, and the Church of the Transfiguration in Ogden. .

Nikas said he and other Greek Orthodox leaders in Utah would brief Elpidophoros on the community’s philanthropic work, as well as the progress of building the church’s proposed $ 300 million Greek town around the cathedral. of the Holy Trinity.

Nikas said Elpidophoros, who moved to his new post in 2019, is from Istanbul and a longtime theology professor. He made headlines last year when he attended a Black Lives Matter protest in Brooklyn.

“It is our moral duty and our obligation to defend the sanctity of every human being. We have faced a pandemic of serious physical illness, but the spiritual illness in our country runs even deeper and must be healed with actions as well as words, ”he told Greek journalist at the time. “And so, I will continue to stand on the sidelines with all those who are committed to preserving peace, justice and equality for every goodwill citizen, regardless of race, religion, gender or ethnicity. . “


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Utah economy

Food and Water in Southern Utah Part 3 – St George News

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Vertical gardening image | Photo by Shironosov / iStock / Getty Images Plus, St. George News

Note: The following is the third in a three part series of Op-Eds. Read part 1 here and part 2 here.

NOTICE – I have discussed a variety of food and water aspects in previous installments of this Op-Ed series. We will now focus on how to advance agriculture and food production here. These suggestions are based, in part, on my own observations and experience working with many countries to protect and develop agricultural production, applying sound science, in a wide range of climates with varying topography and agronomy.

Despite the sobering elements contained in the previous sections, solutions do exist. We are still the masters of our destiny, so to speak. For example, Israel and Spain have faced similar challenges with water and agriculture in their drylands, and they are surprisingly successful.

My conversations with senior officials from these two countries and seeing their amazing results have been inspiring. A large number of greenhouses using drip irrigation and many other innovations are producing incredible amounts of food and other agricultural products for use in the country and for income-generating exports.

These smart applications of technology aligned with nature have also created additional income from visitors wanting to see what’s possible and participate. This is a form of “agritourism”, which is another source of income for the community. Others can learn and be inspired by what we have created.

Photographic illustration. | Photo by anjajuli, iStock / Getty Images Plus, St. George News

So let’s start with some specific ideas to consider, analyze and implement:

  • Plant fruits and vegetables that can thrive in this climate. A local horticulturalist and ethnobotanist identified 29 varieties of fruits, berries and nuts that would do very well in this climate, under good supervision. We can also grow many kinds of vegetables here. Some of them will be doing very well during our winter, which means that certain types of fresh and organic produce will be available all year round.
  • Create More Community Supported Agriculture (CSA): A food system that directly connects producers and consumers to locally grown produce harvested by a certain farm or groups of farms through a subscription process. The consumer agrees to withdraw or receive deliveries on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. All concerned share the risk of harvesting. We already have a local expert who has managed a CSA in Idaho and we have a successful CSA in Cedar City. More ASCs are needed.
  • Create community gardens, using experts, including master gardeners, in soil preparation, crop selection, growing, harvesting and distribution of produce. Too often, good intentions and results don’t match when growing gardens. We can educate and train many people to use even backyards, common areas, and other limited places to successfully grow food and maintain good looks.
  • Review Utah’s agricultural production at the regional and state level to determine any adjustments that can be made to focus production more on growing Utah food for the Utahns.
  • Teach children basic horticulture and food production, with related health information. Create school gardens. Organize friendly competitions.
  • Deploy greenhouse technology that can include a laptop computer to regulate all aspects of the grow. Water, fertilization and other functions are carefully controlled for maximum effect. We can use greenhouses for food and to grow native plants for our homes and community. As our capacity for growth increases, we will no longer need to purchase factories outside of southern Utah.
  • Deploy vertical farming technology that has the potential to produce the same amount of food or more while using up to 90% less water. Vacant lots, empty buildings and newly constructed buildings are viable options for larger scale operations. Outdoor vertical gardens can also be created in virtually any space, as the examples on the Contemporist website show.
  • Watch the documentary “The Need to Grow”.
  • Create a non-political working group of carefully selected experts in sustainable and regenerative agriculture, and water experts, to assess and recommend common options for producing native foods and plants, including the treatment of selected plants for curative and medicinal purposes, among other applications. Each participant will need to look beyond their individual, organizational or professional interests to make objective recommendations to city / county leaders and investors for their decision. Transparency and opportunities for public input will be essential.
  • Investigate the availability of ARPA funds to produce food for the growing number of food banks in Utah.
  • Dixie State University, which appears to be Utah Tech University, may expand its life science program to include environmental sciences (ecology, plant science, and soil science).
  • Raise awareness of our water and food situation and our available solutions by including statements and targets in all forward-looking documents such as city and county multi-year plans. These targets would be created and evaluated by the water district and carefully selected agricultural experts. Supporting these efforts would include putting sustainable and regenerative agriculture and water conservation on the agendas of cities and counties on a regular basis.

Conclusion

This series aims to promote open and constructive dialogue, analysis, and ultimately many viable recommendations to be implemented in order to be successful. Individual study by the public is encouraged, starting with the links provided. Let’s imagine and create a new type of sustainable agriculture locally. This new agricultural paradigm will result in high quality organic products, trained businesses, job creation, grocery stores and restaurants offering more attractive options, a more diverse and strengthened economy and more. This is all possible by using 50-90% less water to produce the same amount or even more food.

St. George City as seen from the Dixie Rock / Sugarloaf Formation at Pioneer Park, St. George, Utah, July 2016 | File photo by Mori Kessler, St. George News

We are looking for visionary city and county leaders who can embrace and effectively manage the inevitable changes to come in our county, remove barriers, and find solutions and resources. These changes go well beyond infrastructure. Fortunately, my early conversations with some local leaders indicate that they are ready to listen and learn. It is a start, although in the final analysis we have to rely on the results. We are also looking for influential thought leaders, investors, vacant buildings, land, etc. We can start small and take incremental action by creating “demo farms” to show what can be created and then scale up.

We can do it. Together. It really is a win-win situation, if we have the foresight and the will to make it happen.

For comments on this letter to the editor and to learn more about growing in arid climates, visit www.ascendantagriculture.com.

Submitted by DAVID C. HATCH, Ivins. Hatch is a former person appointed by the President of the USDA as associate administrator of the US multi-billion dollar crop and livestock insurance program. He is also a hemispheric expert on agricultural risk management and has consulted widely with virtually every country in the hemisphere, including ambassadors, ministers, scientists, the US State Department and the World Bank to create a science-based agricultural policy for small and medium-sized enterprises. farmers, including women. Prior to his service in the public sector, Hatch was an entrepreneur and executive in global risk management. Hatch would like to thank Tony McCammon of Bloom Horticulture for his contribution to this series.

Letters to the Editor are not the product of St. George News, its editors, staff or contributors. The elements stated and the opinions expressed are the responsibility of the person submitting them. They do not reflect the product or opinion of St. George News and are edited only slightly for technical style and formatting.

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Salt lake city

This Fox Group-designed Salt Lake City home features a sleek underground basketball court

When you think of a laundry room, what do you imagine? A dark, oversized closet, maybe – with a waste sink, if you’re lucky? The husband and wife designer duo Cara and Tom Fox, founders of The Renard Group, will not tolerate such a boring space. You will never find a part that is not both functional and beautiful in all the houses they touched.

So, in a recent project for a family in Salt Lake City, Cara Fox designed a laundry room that was both stylish and practical. “The client isn’t afraid to be girly and who she is,” says Fox. To that end, the room features Schumacher floral wallpaper, pink and white striped tiled floors, and a bespoke giant pink table with a marble top. Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. As for function: there’s an oversized farmhouse sink with a Carrara marble backsplash, as well as plenty of cabinetry.

Thanks to Fox’s impeccable attention to detail, it’s not just the sunny laundry room that has received special favor. In the kitchen, for example, Fox wanted to showcase the unique floor-to-ceiling slabs of Calacatta Gold marble that adorned the walls. Rather than covering them with cupboards, she moved most of the storage into a sleek butler’s pantry tucked away in a hallway behind the main cooking area. To boot, she created a large, bespoke room to hide the fridge and other kitchen appliances like the toaster and stand mixer. “I call it the home appliance center,” she said. “It’s super functional, but very cleverly hidden.”

Lindsay Salazar

The family, who love to host events big and small, turned to Fox to revamp several entertainment spaces in the 8,000 square foot sprawl. This includes the formal dining room, which has custom built-in storage space on either side of the fireplace and houses the client’s substantial porcelain and silverware collection. Thoughtful touches make cabinets more than just a grouping of shelves and drawers. Fox chose a revolutionary design to make the rooms more consistent with the classic Dutch colonial exterior of the mansion, and also added details like sculpted flowers that match the golden handles. An ethereal mural by local artist Tyler Huntzinger brings more nature with images of native sycamores, oaks and junipers.

As sophisticated as the residence is, it is home to four children. Fox therefore made sure that its interior would also appeal to the little ones. Good to know: One of the girls’ bedrooms, straight out of an English garden with Schumacher floral-print wallpaper and white lattice details, features a bespoke alcove bed and wardrobes and creative shelves that have room for everything from toys to shoes. “The room looks like a cohesive space,” says Fox. “You don’t really realize, ‘Oh, that’s the closet right there, and there’s the shoe storage.'”

“The client is not afraid to be girly and to be who she is”

If there’s one space in the house that perfectly combines adults’ appreciation for high-end design with children’s high energy, it’s the underground basketball court. “We thought, ‘let’s make this ground beautiful,’” says Fox. The result: a herringbone white oak courtyard. Unique? Certainly. But more importantly: the kids approve.


Cooked

cooked

Lindsay Salazar

cooked

Lindsay Salazar

“We took our inspiration from the English office cabinets and made it a specific size for everyday dishes and cups,” Fox says of the cabinets on either side of the range. Vary: Workshop with a custom walnut hood designed by The Fox Group. Wall lights: Julie Neill Lighting. Walls: Calacatta Gold marble. Brass pendant lights: Ralph Lauren with a custom shade of Schumacher Fabric. Tap: Water stone. Sink: Shaws.


Music chamber

Music chamber

Lindsay Salazar

“I think the stars of this room are the fitted wardrobes. They have a real barrel arch inside the shelves, ”says Fox. The piano is a heirloom from the client’s grandmother. Fireplace tiles: Delftiles. Integrated: Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. Couch: Customer’s own, re-upholstered in Schumacher Fabric. Slipper chairs: Phew. Low table: Phew. Chandelier: Périgold. Lattice wall: Made from custom hand cut diamond shaped boxes.


Dining room

dining room

Lindsay Salazar

The mural here, painted by Tyler Huntzinger, features Utah landscapes that guests love, from seas of trees to mountain scenes. The local artist also painted details in 24k gold on the floor and ceiling. Built-in and dining table: Customized by Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. Chairs: Customer’s own, covered with Schumacher Fabric.


The living room

the living room

Lindsay Salazar

the living room

Lindsay Salazar

“We knew we wanted this room to have a ‘wow’ factor with the two story windows facing the pool,” says Fox. “But we softened the look with the curtains.” Curtains: Schumacher Fabric. Plants: Source by EBW design. Chandelier: Ralph Lauren. Fireplace: Made of bluish limestone. TV: Samsung, with a personalized gold frame. Couch: Customer’s own, covered with Schumacher Fabric. The couches: Customer’s own, covered with Sister parish Fabric.


Main bathroom

bedroom

Lindsay Salazar

The chic master bathroom features white paneling and bespoke vanities. Bathtub: Aqueduct. Vanities: Custom designed by The Fox Group. Mirrors: The Fox Shop.


Master bedroom

bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

For the master bedroom, “we wanted to bring that garden feel,” says Fox. “The flowers, the butterflies, the birds and all the open light.” Wallpaper: Schumacher. Curtains: Schumacher. Chairs: Customer’s own, re-upholstered in Schumacher Fabric. Bed: Custom made by The Fox Group. Sheets: Matouk. Wicker vase: Mainly baskets. Ground: White oak herringbone.


Bathroom

Bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

Although guests live in Salt Lake City, they love the East Coast. For the office powder room, Fox used a preppy nautical print to evoke this region of the United States. Vanity: Aqueduct. Mirror: The Fox Shop. Wall lights: Visual comfort. Wallpaper: Schumacher.


Laundry room

Laundry detergent

Lindsay Salazar

This area is decidedly girly. “The client is not afraid to be who she is,” says Fox. Wallpaper: Schumacher. Sink: Shaws. Board: Customized by Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking.


Girls bathroom

bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

The two girls share this bathroom, which they nicknamed “Jill and Jill”. Bathtub: Vintage Tub & Tub, with a custom color. Tile: Carrara marble. Paintings: Vintage.


Basketball court

basketball court

Lindsay Salazar

The sleek basketball court reinforces the home design game with a cool herringbone pattern. Ground: White oak.


Doll house

doll house

Lindsay Salazar

The dollhouse is huge – five feet tall! – and an exact replica of the real house, having been built from the same materials.


Butler’s Pantry

butler's pantry

Lindsay Salazar

The Butler’s Pantry features the same fabric that Jackie Kennedy used when she remodeled the White House. Curtain fabric: Schumacher. Tiles: Carrara and Bardiglio marble. Drawers: Personalized in 24 karat gold. Sink: Shaws.


Girl’s room

bedroom

Lindsay Salazar

“We wanted this room to look like a secret garden,” says Fox. Bed and built-in wardrobes: Custom designed by The Fox Group. Wallpaper: Schumacher. Pouf: Made to measure by Lee Industries. Sheets: Matouk.


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