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September 2021

Utah economy

Ironman 70.3 World Championship Generates Nearly $ 18 Million Direct Economic Impact For Washington County

Pro female winner Lucy Charles-Barclay and pro male winner Gustav Iden at the finish line of the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in St. George on September 18th. The economic impact of the race will resonate throughout Washington County in the months to come. (Jeff Richards, St. George News)

ST. GEORGE – The Ironman 70.3 World Championship ended a few weeks ago, but the economic impact of the race will resonate throughout Washington County in the months to come.

Before the start of the race, planners and city officials were hoping the international event would generate between $ 15 million and $ 18 million, and early feedback suggests the goal has been met.

“Data collected from athlete surveys confirms that the county achieved nearly $ 18 million in direct economic impact from participants and visitors who came for the event,” wrote Kevin Lewis, director of Greater Zion Convention & Tourism Office, in an email to St. George News. .

“The immediate impact is primarily focused on hotel businesses,” Lewis added. “But these dollars are flowing to other businesses in the region, creating income and jobs in many industries.”

Lewis said that without tourism and the visitor economy in southern Utah, local residents would have fewer options for recreation, dining and entertainment. They would also pay higher personal taxes to support other basic services in the community.

Read the full article on St. George News.

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Salt lake city government

State says it’s not Big Brother by following your electric car

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah’s roads are maintained through gasoline sales taxes. But if you drive an electric car, you don’t need to refuel, of course. A state program gives electric vehicle (EV) owners a device to plug into their cars, which transmits the data to an app loaded on the driver’s smartphone.

As with utilities, drivers pay for what they use.

Paying by the mile doesn’t mean Big Brother is watching your electric car

The Utah Highway User Fee Program is a payment per mile instead of a tax paid per gallon on fuel.

If you drive an unconventional vehicle, you pay 1.5 cents per mile or a flat rate this year of:

  • Electric = $ 120.00
  • Plug-in hybrid = $ 52.00
  • Gasoline hybrid = $ 20.00

For more information or to register for the program, visit roadusagecharge.utah.gov.

But what if you’re an EV driver and don’t like the idea of ​​being followed by the government?

“We have taken all possible measures to ensure that data protection is secure,” Tiffany Pocock, program manager for road user charges at the Department of Transportation of the United Kingdom, told Matt Gephart of KSL TV. Utah.

She said the app allows the driver to track their own mileage, and the electric vehicle’s device is not connected to any phones. Pocock said UDOT does not have access to GPS data and can only read the number of miles logged in order to calculate the tax due.

Dave agrees to be followed. Debbie is not.

Debbie Dujanovic of KSL NewsRadio, Dave & Dujanovic, said she did not agree with the state following her movements if she was driving an electric vehicle. (She said she was considering buying a used Nissan Leaf electric car.)

Co-host Dave Noriega pointed at her cell phone and said she was already being tracked.

Dave, on the other hand, has no problem with Big Brother monitoring his mileage.

“In fact, I support him,” he said. “So when I finish, you know, being kidnapped, you know exactly where I was kidnapped. “

Debbie added that she typically drives around 12,000 miles per year. At 1.5 cents per mile, she would pay $ 180 in user fees per year, so she said she would choose the $ 120 plan.

But according to UDOT, the program is set up in such a way that participants do not pay more per year than they would have paid up front if they had chosen to pay the package.

Dave said he too would opt for the package.

“It’s not that bad if they stalk me. . . As long as you have a phone, you are followed. It doesn’t matter if it’s Google or the government, you are always being followed. The package is a good alternative if you are afraid of them following, ”he said.

Dave & Dujanovic can be heard on weekdays from 9 a.m. to noon. on KSL NewsRadio. Users can find the show on the KSL NewsRadio website and app, as well as Apple Podcasts and Google Play.


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Salt lake city

Meet your next favorite author at the Utah Book Festival

Editor’s Note • This article is part of 150 Things To Do, a draft report and newsletter exploring the best of Utah. Click here to subscribe to the weekly 150 Things newsletter.

Christian McKay Heidicker doesn’t just read his books aloud. He executes them.

It’s a Saturday afternoon at the North Branch of the Weber County Library in Ogden, and the Salt Lake City resident addresses a room of about 20 people, many of whom are mothers with young children. . His voice and movements come alive as he reads his latest book, “Scary Stories for Young Foxes: The City”. The public is captivated by its reading, threaded on every word. (Heidicker’s new set of tales is a companion to his Newberry Honor book, “Scary Stories for Young Foxes,” and other things that “bump” into the night.)

(Photo courtesy of Macmillan Publishers) The cover of “Scary Stories for Young Foxes”, by Salt Lake City author Christian McKay Heidicker. The book was named a Newbery Honor winner in 2020.

The September 25 Heidicker reading was part of this year’s Utah Humanities Book Festival, which began in September and runs through October. Featuring dozens of authors who write everything from fiction to non-fiction to poetry, this year’s events bring readers together – and face to face with writers – across the state.

Heidicker said the Book Festival is a chance to speak with people he would typically never connect with.

“My readers are really generous with their attention and questions, and it’s very rewarding,” he said.

Find a community on and off the page

Now in its 24th year, the festival has grown over time from a one-day or weekend event to a “two-month literary event marathon,” said Willy Palomo, program manager. from the Utah Humanities’ Center for the Book.

Upcoming events will feature writers such as:

  • Terry Tempest Williams, writer and environmental activist. (October 7, 6 p.m., Brigham City Museum of Art & History)

  • Tara Westover, New York Times bestselling author of “Educated,” a memoir about leaving your survival family to pursue a formal education (October 9, 6 p.m., Zoom conference call)

  • The Chicano poet Antonio López, author of “Gentefication”, his first collection of poetry. (Oct. 15, 7 p.m., location to be specified)

The statewide festival runs until October 30. For a full program, visit the Utah Humanities website.

Palomo said local partners decide which books to highlight in their communities, and then he helps coordinate with the authors.

The significance of the festival is different depending on where the Utah events are held, he said. The context of a particular community is reflected in the book choices for each event. For example, a neighborhood could engage with nature by focusing on environmental literature; in another, the festival might aim to promote under-represented voices.

But no matter where a particular place focuses, “It’s a joy to be able to walk through communities everywhere… and to have these conversations about books that matter to those communities,” said Palomo.

He added that the best part of his job is when book festival attendees are touched or enlightened or even troubled by what an author has brought to the table.

These experiences also improved his own life, he said. “Now I’m going to travel the world differently because I know something new. “

Planning and promoting the festival is not without challenges. Palomo said that sometimes people who work in the humanities are not immune to wanting every event to attract “football stadiums” full of people, so it can be disappointing to see only a few people attending a game. event.

However, “I think there is something really valuable about having a smaller conversation sometimes,” he said. Smaller events increase “the degree of vulnerability” as well as the opportunity to “get to know people” that you might not have encountered otherwise.

COVID-19 has also had an impact on the festival. Last year it was completely virtual, Palomo said; this year there has been a mix of virtual and in-person events.

“Yes [virtual options] that’s what people are comfortable doing programming like this with, so that’s what we’re going to do, ”he said. “And then some communities… really need an in-person component to even get people out.”

Either way, Palomo said virtual options will never go away after this year. Technology has allowed the festival to connect with international writers they otherwise could not afford to feature, he said, and it has also enabled rural communities to participate more.

Additionally, he said it provides more options for people with disabilities and those who are just too busy to attend live events.

“If you’re a busy parent who can’t go out to a little bookstore or whatever at night… you can still get a glimpse of what we’re working on,” Palomo said.

The festival hasn’t been able to live-stream all of the events in person this year, but it’s something they are working on going forward, he added.

A good book can change you

Palomo said he hopes that in any community, people will walk away from the Book Festival events after falling in love with literature and new storytellers.

In particular, he hopes teens learn how books can help them navigate the world.

“The importance [for teens] is to understand what a great tool is [books] are to get you through life, ”he said.

Books are also a way of setting an example, Palomo said. Research shows that growing up in a family of readers increases the likelihood that children will be readers as well.

And there is no limit to what the books can contain. The Book Festival makes a point of including all types of works, from traditional novels to cowboy poetry.

Palomo recognizes that reading has a bad reputation “when you frequently read the wrong things”.

“There are books that match your interests, that are told in a way that [you] up, ”he said. “It is simply a question of finding [them]. “

Editor’s Note • 150 Things To Do is a reporting project and weekly newsletter made possible through the generous support of the Utah Tourist Board. Subscribe to the 150 things newsletter here.


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Utah economy

Customer Opinion: Responding Effectively to Climate Change | News, Sports, Jobs

Isaac Hale, Daily Herald file photo

Smoke from wildfires lingers in the air as living trees and those scorched by wildfires blend together, as seen from the Mount Nebo Scenic Drive in southern Utah County, the Monday, October 5, 2020 (Isaac Hale, Daily Herald file photo)

In the face of drought, record heat, flash floods and smoke from forest fires, it was hard not to recognize the effects of global warming this summer. In this context, a crowd of high school students marched on the steps of the capital in Salt Lake City to demand climate action as part of Friday’s global climate strike.

We are grateful that so many young people care about this important issue. But we would like to add some perspective to the conversation from our perspective as young conservatives. Protesters this weekend called on lawmakers to respond urgently to climate change, but we would like to explain how they could respond effectively as well.

Which policies are the most effective?

The best policies protect America from the worst possible environmental and economic consequences. As Jonathan Adler, a professor at Case Western Reserve University, has often explained, managing climate risk is like buying an insurance policy: hedging against an uncertain future, but getting premiums as low as possible. The goal is to minimize the total costs to American families, which includes the costs of climate change and the costs of the policies themselves.

Thinking about climate action in this way exposes many climate initiatives as ineffective or fanciful, like the Green New Deal, which uses environmental rhetoric as a mask for more radical economic goals.

But there are proposals that pass the economic cost test. Among these is the Baker-Shultz Carbon Dividends framework that several Republican college leaders from BYU and UVU endorse. Despite America’s bitterly polarized political landscape, there is a virtual consensus among economists on the merits of this political approach. This solidarity is possible because independent organizations have modeled the costs and benefits of this plan, both for the climate and for the economy, and have repeatedly confirmed its effectiveness.

For those of us who don’t have the training to dissect these complex business models, there are a few other ways to recognize the superiority of market-based approaches like carbon dividends. Perhaps the easiest is to examine the effect on global (not just national) carbon emissions.

Even if every car and chimney in America stopped emitting carbon dioxide today, there would still be too much carbon entering the atmosphere in the world (not to mention that you might have a hard time getting to work. and power your home). Unfortunately, many climate plans ignore this reality, and the climate conversation is often dominated by liberal voices who want to dramatically increase regulations on U.S. businesses. Their logic is that if the United States leads by decarbonizing its own economy, other countries will follow our lead.

The reality is that when the United States – whose carbon emissions have been declining steadily for years – crack down on its own carbon emissions, it will inadvertently cause companies to move their operations to countries like China and India with many. less environmental regulations. Not only will this lead to worse environmental outcomes, but it will also shift investment and employment opportunities overseas. Far from setting an example, this approach will weaken the US economy, while giving other nations a reason to resist decarbonization.

We cannot wait for other countries to adopt our environmental agenda without offering them the means to do so. As Senator Mitt Romney, who has advocated for market-based climate action, recently explained, global emission reductions will not happen without breakthrough new technologies.

When clean energy becomes cheaper than dirtier alternatives, developing countries will naturally move away from carbon. But this will require significant innovation on the part of private companies. The United States (and, in many ways, Utah!) Is helping lead the innovation process, but there are ways to speed it up.

The previously mentioned carbon dividend plan uses an adjustment to the carbon frontier, coupled with a carbon price, to address these challenges. It would hold foreign manufacturers accountable for their pollution – and in so doing, level the playing field for American businesses – and spur the innovation needed to develop cheaper clean energy.

And that’s just the beginning. Carbon pricing would also make nuclear power more competitive, encourage fossil fuel companies to expand carbon capture, and produce other valuable climate outcomes, all without a dime in additional government spending. No wonder this policy has the support of environmental groups and industry leaders, as well as influential Utahns and conservative voters.

Now is not the time to pretend climate change is a hoax. But if we are not careful in our response, we may find that we are only pretending to solve the problem.

With a smart and internationally oriented strategy like Baker-Shultz, we can get straight to the point and deliver concrete results on climate change. In every way, that would make all the difference.

Tyler Cooper is the vice president of UVU College Republicans and Andrew Sandstrom is a past president of BYU College Republicans.

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Salt lake city government

State school mask bans tangled with budget plans and controversy

AP covers complex legal movements in Arizona over school mask bans and the state budget. The Detroit Free Press covers similar maneuvers in Michigan. Separately, reports state that the Department of Education will cover the salaries of members of Broward County school boards withheld due to school mask rules.

AP: Arizona High Court allows upholding of school mask ban

The Arizona Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to immediately reinstate a series of new laws that include measures that prevent schools from requiring masks and remove the power of local governments to impose COVID-19 restrictions. The High Court rejected the request of the Attorney General of the Republic, Mark Brnovich, to allow the entry into force of the provisions of three state budget bills and one entire budget bill. Instead, the court set a briefing schedule for it to consider Brnovich’s request to bypass the Court of Appeal and hear the case directly. (Christie, 9/29)

Detroit Free Press: Whitmer: Budget coins canceling local mask orders unconstitutional

Michigan lawmakers cannot use the state budget to threaten funding for local health departments that institute local school mask rules, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said in a letter to lawmakers on Wednesday. The governor considers this pandemic provision in the nearly $ 70 billion budget unconstitutional and therefore unenforceable. “Lawmakers cannot roll out the public health code into a budget bill or inappropriate funds because they challenge the actions of local health departments,” Whitmer wrote in the letter. (Boucher, 9/29)

WLRN 91.3 FM: Federal government covers Broward school board salaries that state withheld due to mask policy

The US Department of Education announced Tuesday that it is awarding more than $ 420,000 to the Broward County School Board to cover state financial penalties on the salaries of school board members. The grant is intended to pay the salaries of eight Broward board members who voted for a student mask term that allows exceptions only for medical reasons during the COVID-19 pandemic. (9/29)

Salt Lake Tribune: Here’s where the masks have gone that Utah officials promised schools in Salt Lake City County

To help keep Utah’s children “as safe as possible” from COVID-19, Governor Spencer Cox in August pledged to provide more than a million masks to students in Kindergarten to Grade 12, at the Both surgical style masks and higher quality KN95 masks in small and large sizes. As of Tuesday, 2.2 million masks had been shipped to schools, according to Tom Hudachko, spokesman for the Utah Department of Health. Of these, 310,000 were pediatric-sized fabric masks, 700,000 were pediatric-sized three-layer surgical masks and the rest were KN95s, he said. But low demand for the masks means some Salt Lake County school districts have left them in storage. “I would say that every day, on average, throughout the building, about a quarter of my children wear masks,” John Paul Sorensen, director of Neil Armstrong Academy in West Valley City, said Tuesday. (Jacobs, 9/29

In updates on quarantines and vaccines –

AP: Louisiana school chief removes COVID quarantine suggestion

Going against health advice, the Louisiana Department of Education announced on Wednesday that it no longer recommends that public school systems quarantine asymptomatic students who have come in close contact with a person who tests positive. for COVID-19. Louisiana’s 69 local school districts already had the opportunity to determine whether they wanted to send students home for days due to exposure to the coronavirus disease. But most districts had followed the state’s education department’s recommendation that these students should be quarantined, even if they did not show symptoms of COVID-19. (Deslatte, 9/29)

The Charlotte Observer: Union County’s New COVID Quarantine Agreement with Schools

After threats of legal action, the Union County Public School District has agreed to work with the county health department to ensure that COVID-19 contact tracing steps and quarantine requirements are followed. The Union County Public Health Department and Union County Public Schools agreed on Wednesday on a process to identify and exclude students and staff identified as a positive case or close contact of a person who tested positive for COVID-19. (Costa, 9/29)

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Illinois teachers sue districts over statewide immunization warrant

Ten teachers in the eastern metropolitan area who refuse to comply with statewide vaccine and mask mandates are suing their school districts over the policies. The lawsuit against Triad, in Troy, and the Edwardsville school districts and their superintendents indicates that the warrants were issued illegally. The Madison County Circuit Court lawsuit calls for teachers to be allowed to continue working in their schools. School districts “do not have the delegated authority to mandate vaccination or testing,” said lawyer Thomas DeVore of Greenville. “They could have defended their educators… but they don’t want to face the governor. “(Bernhard, 9/29)

AP: University of Colorado faces COVID religious exemption lawsuit

A pediatrician and a medical student at the University of Colorado medical campus at Anschutz are contesting denials of their requests for religious exemptions from the school’s COVID vaccination mandate, arguing in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that administrators are ruling ” truth ”of personal religious beliefs in violation of the First Amendment. The U.S. District Court lawsuit filed by the Thomas More Society, a Chicago-based conservative nonprofit, is the latest clash over a growing number of private and public sector vaccine mandates across national government to stem the spread of the coronavirus, which has killed more than 600,000 people in the United States (Nieberg, 9/30)

In other school news –

The Washington Post: School nutrition programs face new crisis as supply chain disruptions and labor shortages limit food deliveries

Square pizza and chicken fillets are suddenly swapped for pieces of meatloaf and zucchini. American school children and lunch ladies make faces. And now the federal government is stepping in to help. Kansas school districts cannot get whole wheat flour, ranch dressing, or Crispitos taco rolls at this time. In Dallas, they can’t get their hands on cutlery, plates, and napkins. In New York City, school districts are unable to find chicken, condiments or carrots without antibiotics. (Reiley, 9/29)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of coverage of health policies by major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.


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Salt lake city

Real Salt Lake remember Utah DB Aaron Lowe ahead of LA Galaxy game

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah –Real Salt Lake remembered Utah Utes defensive back Aaron Lowe from before the club’s game against LA Galaxy.

RSL hosted Los Angeles at Rio Tinto Stadium on Wednesday, September 29.

Lowe was killed in a shooting in Salt Lake City on Sunday, September 26.

Before kicking off against the Galaxy, Real Salt Lake remembered Lowe and posted a photo of the late defensive back on social media.

“# 22Forever,” RSL tweeted alongside a red heart emoji.

Real Salt Lake’s game against LA kicked off at the same time the University of Utah held a candlelight vigil for Lowe.

The Real Salt Lake game against the Galaxy is streamed on the KSL Sports app and on KSLSports.com.

About Aaron Lowe

Aaron Lowe was the first recipient of the Ty Jordan Memorial Scholarship and changed his number from 2 to 22 during the offseason to honor the life of his childhood friend.

Before the BYU game, the Cougars walked out of their tunnel with an “LLTJ” flag. As Utah came out of its tunnel, former Ute Samson Nacua handed the flag to quarterback and captain Cam Rising, who handed the flag to Aaron Lowe.

Lowe signed with Utah in 2019 as a three-star rookie from West Mesquite High School. He played in 11 games on special teams in his freshman year. During COVID-19’s shortened season, Lowe played in all five special team games in 2020.

SLCPD chief Mike Brown has confirmed that Aaron Lowe was shot and killed in a Sugarhouse neighborhood.

According to a press release sent by the SLCPD, they received a call around 10:30 p.m. MDT on Saturday, September 25 for a noise complaint about a house party at 2200 block of South Broadmoor Street. At approximately 12:30 a.m. MDT on Sunday, September 26, SLC911 received a call from a local person reporting a fight involving a weapon. Police were dispatched immediately after the changed circumstances changed the appeal from a noise complaint to an ongoing emergency.

The statement also said he was under investigation for homicide.

Police tweeted an update at 8:30 a.m. MDT stating that the on-site investigation is complete and all street closures have been lifted. They ask anyone with information about the case to call 801-799-3000 and reference case number 21-176828.

Trevor Allen is a Utah Utes insider for KSLSports.com, co-host of the Faith, Family and Football podcast with Clark Phillips III and host of the Crimson Corner podcast. Follow him on Twitter: @TrevorASports.



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Utah economy

Utah’s booming population, impacts of aging infrastructure on air pollution are a growing concern

As part of Utah’s 5th Annual Climate Week, panelists met after the premiere of a local documentary to discuss air pollution on Tuesday. (Mark Wetzel, KSL)

SALT LAKE CITY – Utah Senator Derek Kitchen raised “red flags” regarding the future of the state’s air quality during a panel following the premiere of a local documentary centered on air pollution in Utah.

The film “AWiRE: What’s Beneath the Clouds” premiered to an audience on Tuesday, with a panel of speakers to answer questions. While discussing the hope each panelist had for Utah’s climate solutions, Kitchen, who represents Salt Lake City, began by citing his growing concerns.

The Democratic state senator pointed out that recent U.S. census data shows Utah to be the fastest growing state in the country. The state has ranked among the best in its economy, GDP growth, and business opportunities over the years, leading to what Kitchen called “explosive growth on the Wasatch front.”

While this growth bodes well for the state’s opportunities, Kitchen expects it to put “tremendous pressure” on Utah’s air quality and infrastructure.

“We’re going to continue to see more people cramming in and we’re going to continue to see more cars on the road. We need to electrify our network. Ultimately it comes down to these big systemic changes that we need to focus on. as a community, ”Kitchen told the audience.“ It is truly essential that we continue to promote progressive policy that meaningfully addresses issues of energy, the way we consume things and the air we breathe. . “

Part of that progressive policy, Kitchen said, is in the way zoning and town planning is done.

A sentiment supported by Daniel Mendoza, professor at the University of Utah, who conducts research in metropolitan urban planning and atmospheric sciences. While many climate activists point to industrial air pollution as the main contributor, Mendoza said industries only make up about 15%, cars 50% and the construction sector 30%.

Whether it is consumer choices, legislative changes or government regulations that have the greatest influence on air pollution, the panel emphasized collective responsibility.

“We all have an individual responsibility for our own choices, and I think we all also have a responsibility to try to advance our group choices, our societal choices, our legislative choices,” said the representative of the Raymond Ward State. “We can’t control them, we have a responsibility to try to push what little we can.”

“It’s very hard for me to hear people say ‘someone else should fix this’ when I see them idling, trying to cheat their car inspections and wanting to get five packages now,” he said. added Mendoza.

But despite the shared responsibility of the community, the harmful effects of air pollution are disproportionate in this community.

The Healthy Environment Alliance of Utah, or HEAL Utah, found that communities living on the west side of the valley, where highways and the majority of industrial sources are located, tend to be more exposed to pollution than communities on the east side. .

The disproportionate effects were explored in the film through local Utahn stories.

“We started to delve deeper into this problem and we realized how systemic and endemic this problem is and how disparate this problem is in the communities of Salt Lake, and it really broadened its scope,” said the director Jack Hessler.

“No one should be subjected to pollution or damage just because of where they live, the color of their skin or who they are. You have to learn to grow as a community as opposed to the capitalist view of growth: get your money and get your big house and get away from pollution instead of “let’s get rid of the pollution that harms and affects our communities”, he said. said Carmen Valdez, political associate for HEAL Utah.

The film’s premiere was part of the fifth annual Utah Climate Week, hosted by the Utah Climate Action Network. The annual series of events features a group of organizations, businesses, leaders and residents on the impact of climate change on Utah and solutions. The film “What’s Beneath the Clouds” is open to the public from Wednesday and can be viewed online.

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Salt lake city government

How a federal government shutdown would affect Utah

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – Congress is negotiating in Washington DC on Wednesday, in hopes that a resolution can be found to maintain funding for government agencies until early December.

If enough votes are not obtained – Democrats will need help reaching the 60 votes needed to pass the resolution in the Senate – the government will enter a shutdown when the clock strikes at 12:01 am Friday.

The effects of a potential shutdown would certainly be felt in the Hive State, according to Jason Perry, director of the Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah.

They were felt during the last government shutdown from December 22, 2018 to January 25, 2019, Perry says.

“The Utahns pretty much know since the last shutdown, it had an impact here,” he told ABC4.com, mentioning that the university’s Gardner Policy Institute estimated that around 10,000 government employees in Utah were on leave or working without pay during the previous stoppage.

These employees included a large portion of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), about 1,000 in total, living in the Davis and Weber County area, which Perry said is the highest concentration of federal employees in the western United States, who was asked to work without pay while on vacation during that 35-day period between 2018 and 2019.

Other government agencies that have a major impact on daily life in Utah would also be affected, one of the most notable perhaps being the National Parks Services (NPS). Any government shutdown would result in the closure of national parks, of which Utah has the most in the country. The impact could reverberate through communities who depend on parks for their livelihoods.

“When it comes to a national park, for example, all the hotels, the restaurants, the people who work for them, they are all affected to some extent, and that also has an impact on the state of the ‘Utah,’ illustrates Perry. “There is also an economic impact there, and most definitely an impact on the paychecks of these workers and the impacts on their families.”

During the 2018-19 shutdown, state funds were reallocated to keep Utah national parks open, due to fears of economic disaster in their communities.

ABC4.com contacted the IRS and was directed to resources provided by the US Department of the Treasury. Although part of a 130-page IRS overview states “While we do not plan to use the plan, prudent management requires agencies to prepare for this eventuality,” a plan is in place at worst case scenario and a shutdown is activated.

According to the IRS contingency plan, a percentage of employees would be retained in the event of a business interruption. If a shutdown were to occur during a non-filing season (which coincidentally begins on Friday, when that potential shutdown would go into effect and last until the end of 2021), 39% of employees would stay on the job. On a hypothetical shutdown during the filling season, that number would drop to 57.6%.

ABC4 also contacted an NPS spokesperson, who said the organization was reviewing its contingency plan while adding “Decisions regarding specific operations and programs have not been made.”

If the figurative doors of Congress were to be slammed for an indefinite period of time, Perry worries it will become some sort of humming affair, with voices on both sides blaming the other. That, along with an already widespread mistrust of the government on the part of some, could make things ugly.

“Besides the other implications of the shutdown, this is becoming a serious messaging problem on both sides of the aisle,” Perry speculates. “This is what happens after a government shutdown. People start to wonder who is to blame, and both parties will try to blame the other party.

But as talks continue in the nation’s capital, Perry hopes government leaders can avoid a shutdown that would be the first to occur during a global pandemic.

“From my observations, negotiations are taking place in Washington in earnest and there appears to be a desire to ensure that a government shutdown does not happen.”


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Salt lake city

Citizen revolt: week of September 30 | Citizen revolt | Salt lake city

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Roaming applicants
Roaming is on the Salt Lake City ballot in November, so when deciding who to vote for, you need to know their plan first. Crossroads Urban Center sponsored Salt Lake City Applicant Forums on Housing and Homelessness with almost all applicants this quarter. And there are many. There are elections in constituencies 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7. If you don’t know which constituency you are voting in, check out this map (https://bit.ly/3ENSi4D). And to see who’s running, look here (https://bit.ly/2ZtvdEf). Applicants will be asked about who camped outside in the winter, what to do with the federal bailout money, affordable housing, and how to care for homeless families and children. If you missed wards 2 or 3, you can find recordings on the Carrefour website. Virtual, Thursday, Friday and Monday, Sept. 30, Oct. 1 and Oct. 4, 11 a.m., free. https://bit.ly/39trRTp

Redux of the women’s march
No, we still haven’t passed the Equal Rights Amendment, and yes, we are still fighting to protect women’s reproductive rights. But the constitutional law known as Roe v. Wade is attacked again. Women have been parading on the US Capitol since 2016, after the far right won with the election of Donald Trump. “From the crisis facing women in Afghanistan to the abortion ban in Texas, how did we get here and where do we go from here?” ask the organizers. They will present the Feminist Future series every Wednesday, September 29 through Nov 5 at 5 pm to help you understand how race, class, sexuality and gender shape our communities. Join SLC UT Women’s March, City and County Building, 450 S. State, Saturday, Oct. 2, 11 a.m., free. https://bit.ly/3nXQ2lg

Women in leadership
Speaking of women, how about hearing from Lieutenant Governor Deidre Henderson, who joined Governor Spencer Cox’s administration after spending eight years in the State Senate. “She has acquired a reputation as a strong conservative, a champion of open government and a staunch advocate for women and families,” say the organizers of A Fireside Conversation with Lieutenant Governor Deidre Henderson on Women and Leadership. Henderson will answer questions about “why, where and how women today are needed to influence, influence and lead in all contexts”. If you want answers don’t miss this. USU Brigham City Campus & Virtual / Register, 989 S. Main, Brigham City, Friday October 1, noon, free. https://bit.ly/3nZ2Bgd

Districts ‘R’ Us
Every week, Weekly City highlights the public hearings on the redistribution process around the state. You voted for an independent Utah Redistribution Commission, so — unless you want to be gerrymandered — you should find out what they’re doing and support them now. This week, discover the UIRC public hearing — Glendale district. Suazo Business Center, 960 W. 1700 South, Friday October 1, 6 p.m., free. https://bit.ly/3zDpVSM


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Salt lakes real estate

Somewhere Else | Columns

Home is where the heart is. We all know that.

Over these months and now years I have written to my satisfaction and given the very encouraging responses received I continue to reflect on the people and places of Vermont.

I love my house as you love yours. We are all the better to appreciate where the heart feels at home.

But for all of us, there is another place that attracts us. We all recognize that many, perhaps most of us, come from elsewhere.

About 40 years ago, when we bought our farm, I remember our first trip to the city dump, correctly and only sometimes called “the transfer station”.

The attendant first saw me with my Connecticut plates and said with a smile, “We don’t like anyone here by the way.”

I asked quickly: “And where, my friend, are you from?” He said, “Connecticut.” Then the conversation turned. “Did you know,” he said, “Wheelock was founded by people in Connecticut? “

Another place could be a lot of places. The now established Vermonter said quirkily, “You better not tell anyone how wonderful this life is in this place.”

Well, I’m from somewhere else. I never thought I would one day end up in Vermont, even though I skied all the mountains here when I was president of the West Hartford, Connecticut Ski Club in high school.

But I knew northern New England had a deep hold on me as a camp director and boating instructor on several beautiful lakes.

What brought me here was a pastoral role visiting a great lady, the well known and much loved Allis Reid, whose son and husband tragically passed away in the mid-1960s. Allis was the one of my older students at the University of Hartford and her family had been a member of the church that took me to my doctoral program.

Allis said, “Buy the old farm up the road, Bob, you’ll never regret it.” Even though it was barricaded and partially falling, we made the jump.

We thought that as a family we could ski Burke regularly, although we were fully engaged in a Connecticut church – one of the great churches in America.

I thought, “Just what I didn’t need! We had a beautiful rectory and our own waterfront home in Old Saybrook. We had deep and permanent roots there near the lighthouses and even had Katharine and Marion Hepburn as neighbors and even with precious pastoral ties with the Hepburn family.

Because I was conceived in a place called Fenwick and later in life I led the summer worship service at Saint Mary’s By The Sea every year, I knew this place would always anchor me there.

This other place has always caught my eye. It wasn’t so much real estate or even the beautiful memories.

It was the salty air and, oh yes, the seagulls, the sand, the shells, the dry, floating seaweed that made this elsewhere so expensive.

I tried to shake it somewhere else, just like you got your own heart.

Throughout my long and beloved pastorate at Peacham, I was helped by a tender annual remembrance gift when Bob and Sharon Fuehrer brought a Mason jar filled with the powerful smelling seaweed, seashells and salt water.

I kept it in the fridge and sniffed it at least twice a day. The Fueher’s spent the summer in their Maine home, returning to Peacham for various reasons. They knew the pastor worked diligently all summer. After all, 50 percent of the people in Peacham are seasonal. There was the excitement of the Tractor Parade on the 4th, a vibrant PAMFest, a Maple Leaf Seven concert, animal blessing and endless good times with the people in the summer. I was busy, but Bob and Sharon knew the scents of the shore were calling me elsewhere.

We all have our own stories of how we got to this place in this country we love.

Hearing the stories of others makes our own journey precious. Let’s celebrate this, even though it has been difficult at times.

I used to be the senior pastor of a huge church in Florida. In October, snowbirds would start arriving from the north. All year round, Floridians would often leave in October to travel north with their families for Thanksgiving and Christmas to visit people and places along the way.

The Psalmist was right when he wrote of the goodness of “our going out and coming in”.

It’s more than the anguish of feeling that the grass is always greener on the other side.

Perhaps we can be comforted by the wisdom to know that the leaves here are more beautiful than elsewhere. After all, the whole world comes to see the generosity of this beautiful place which for them is elsewhere.

My dear longtime friends, Susan and Stuart O’Brien from Peacham have struggled each year to decide when to go to their lovely seaside home in Florida. Stuart always wanted to leave early. Susan always wanted to stay here a little longer. She’d say a little sadly over the years, “Oh Bob, it’s my last Sunday, Stuart wants to go.”

I always asked, “Why go there?” Stay here a little longer. She always replied, “But I love my husband. We would laugh together.

Perhaps the best way to deal with October is to be grateful for the memories from elsewhere and summers past and to honor our homes and hearts right here in the Northeast Kingdom. I will give thanks for the seasons to come.

Why not let Thanksgiving start in October.

Bob Potter lives with his family in Wheelock and is pastor of the Monadnock Congregational Church of the Great North Woods in Colebrook, New Hampshire. The services are available on Youtube. He can be contacted at [email protected]


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