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Fenice Mediterranean Bistro and The Capital Grill steakhouse will open on Regent Street in Salt Lake City.

The former Utah Power & Light building will house an upscale steakhouse.

(Steve Griffin | The Salt Lake Tribune) New restaurants are planned for Regent Street in Salt Lake City, located behind the Eccles Theater.

Editor’s Note • This story is only available to Salt Lake Tribune subscribers. Thank you for supporting local journalism.

New restaurants will soon open on Regent Street in Salt Lake City, the redeveloped block behind the Eccles Theater.

Fenice Mediterranean Bistro plans to open in a few weeks at 126 S. Regent, where Fireside on Regent was once located. As its name suggests, it will offer Italian and Mediterranean dishes as well as wood-fired pizzas.

This is the second restaurant for Jeff and Lisa Ward, who also own Park City’s popular Silver Star Cafe.

The grill of the capital, according to the company site, will launch in winter 2022 in the former Utah Power & Light building at the corner of 100 South and Regent streets. It will be Utah’s first restaurant for the national steakhouse chain, which has more than five dozen locations in the United States and Mexico City.

The building is owned by Taubman Properties, which operates the City Creek Center and the mall’s other two national restaurant chains – The Cheesecake Factory and Brio Tuscan Grille.

Fenice and The Capital Grill received full-service liquor licenses from the state last week, which will allow diners to have wine, beer or spirits with their food.

Regent Street, which is located between Main and State streets and 100 and 200 South, was once home to the Utah dailies and, before that, the Salt Lake City red light district.

As part of the construction of the Eccles Center, the street also received a facelift and was designed to be a pedestrian-friendly way to connect the City Creek Center to the north and the Gallivan Center to the south.

While there has been a rotating list of restaurants across the street, the most popular current restaurant today is Pretty Bird, a laid-back Nashville-style hot chicken restaurant. Other current occupants include Honest Eatery and FreshFin Poke.


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The future of downtown Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is booming and consistently tops lists of the best places to live and work.

“We’re really not missing out on much,” said Karen Bow of Visit Salt Lake. “Salt Lake is one of the few destinations our size with a professional symphony, professional opera, professional ballet.”

Bow promotes Utah’s capital to the rest of the world, claiming Salt Lake is a modern mountainous center of the west.

With a massive new convention center hotel on the way and a vast array of residential and commercial construction projects, the city is changing and evolving.

But is it for the best?

FOX 13’s Kelly Chapman spent an afternoon in Salt Lake City asking residents and business owners what it would take to build a better city. The answers were varied.

Shamus Funk has said he would like more things for the kids to do, Lara Miller wants more parks and gathering places to connect with locals, and Jordan Hollman would like a stronger cultural scene.

“It’s easy to say, a lot harder to implement, but a more booming art scene and not just, like, fine art,” Hollman said.

Nick Norris, the planning director of Salt Lake City, says that in addition to affordable housing, the city needs a green loop, that is, parks along the downtown area where there are has a lot of density, but open spaces are hard to find.

And while city officials tackle big issues, some local small business owners feel they’ve been left out of the planning.

Ken Sanders Rare Books is a unique store that has taken up residence in Salt Lake, but they feel like they’ve been kicked out.

“You look out the front door of my bookstore and you can see six building cranes going up. Ten stories, 20 stories, 31 stories across the street… and then we’re next, ”said store owner Ken Sanders.

Sanders has exhibited his collection of books and artwork in the same building for the past 20 years and said a corporate investor was considering demolishing the building to replace it with a skyscraper, but he didn’t. leaving nowhere to go with dwindling location options and rents skyrocketing.

Matt Caputo, the owner of Caputo’s Deli, a well-known deli on the west side of Salt Lake, would like to see more attention and detail to the architecture and city laws that will allow restaurants and bars to shop. alcohol at wholesale prices to inaugurate more catering establishments.

Caputo brings up an additional point that he says requires not only the immediate attention of lawmakers, but every Utahn.

“One thing to make our city a better city is to really take clean air seriously,” he said.

Watch the video above to learn more about this detailed 360 report.


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This is where Utah ranks in drug overdose deaths in 2020

2021-07-22

More than 93,000 people died from drug overdoses in the United States in 2020, an increase of almost 30% from 2019 and the most on record in a single year, according to recently released data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Drug addiction experts say the increase in overdose deaths is largely due to the increased presence of the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl in the United States. Other contributors include issues related to the coronavirus pandemic, such as increased isolation and job losses.

Utah is the state with the 17th lowest number of drug overdose deaths per capita in 2020. There were 19 fatal overdoses per 100,000, for a total of 622 drug overdose deaths.

Last year, most reported an increase in drug overdose deaths after seeing a decrease in deaths in 2019. In Utah, there were 18 fatal drug overdoses in the state per 100,000 population, for a total of 575, in 2019.

The average number of overdose deaths in Utah between 2015 and 2019 was 20 per 100,000 people per year, the 25th of all U.S. states, or an average of 630 overdose-related deaths per year.

To determine which states had the highest drug overdose death rates, 24/7 Wall St. looked at the CDC’s recently released preliminary estimates of drug overdose deaths. States are ranked by the number of drug-related deaths per 100,000 population. These are the states with the most drug overdose deaths per capita in 2020. These are the states with the most drug overdose deaths in 2020.


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Visiting Greek Orthodox Archbishop meets Interfaith Council

The ties between Eastern and Western Christianity were fully visible on Tuesday when the head of the Greek Orthodox Church in America visited Utah’s top Roman Catholic leader.

Together, they – and representatives of the Salt Lake Interfaith Roundtable – emphasized the importance of dialogue and the need for interfaith unity.

The meeting was part of the visit to Salt Lake City by the Greek Orthodox Bishop Elpidophoros (Lambriniadis), the first trip to Utah by a Greek Orthodox archbishop since 2000, according to information from local Greek Orthodox leaders.

Tuesday evening’s reception was hosted by Bishop Oscar Solis, who leads more than 300,000 Roman Catholics in Utah, at the pastoral center of the Diocese of Salt Lake City.

The group subsequently toured downtown Salt Lake City. Madeleine Cathedral.

In his remarks to the Interfaith Roundtable, Elpidophoros underlined the meaning and impact of dialogue in interfaith relations.

The word “dialogue” in Greek generally refers to “an unusually diverse range of realities,” a definition which he says “resonates strongly” in an interfaith context.

“Dialogue becomes the key,” he said, “in which we are all called to dissolve our divisions, to heal hatred, to foster resilience, to fight against prejudices… [and] promote peace and reconciliation.

Elpidophoros said the Greek Orthodox Church recognizes differences but believes in cooperation and peace between religions. It really means listening to other points of view and accepting common values.

The real dialogue, Elpidophoros said, begins in families and communities.

“Make your faith, make your tradition richer,” he said. “Wealth comes from ecumenical values [of] listen to others [and] to receive all that is good.

Solis said Catholics follow Pope Francis’ advice in creating human relationships with people of all other faiths.

These relationships “define the course of our vision and our mission as a Catholic community,” he said. “We come from one God and we are all children of God. … and this is why we can easily see each other as brothers and sisters.

Muslim makes his own sacrifice

Elpidophoros especially thanked Zeynep Kariparduc, president of the Salt Lake City Interfaith Council and a Muslim woman, for attending the event when she could have celebrated Eid al-Adha, or the feast of sacrifice, with her family and friends.

As a native of Turkey, Elpidophoros said he understood the importance – indeed the sacrifice – of Kariparduc missing part of the Islamic holiday by several days.

He presented him with a silver medallion made in Istanbul that depicts Abraham or Ibrahim (a revered prophet in Christianity, Islam and Judaism) and his wife Sarah harboring three angels.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Archbishop Elpidophoros of America presents a medallion to Zeynep Kariparduc during a visit to the Cathedral of the Magdalen in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, July 20, 2021.

He also presented Solis with a silver cross made in Istanbul.

Kariparduc said people of different faiths should get to know each other so that they can better practice their own faith.

Tuesday night’s meeting was important, she said, because as religious leaders come to an agreement, so will their followers.

“Without the other, we cannot create a diverse society,” she said. “Religious leaders play a crucial role in establishing[ing] peaceful societies.

“Keeping our identity alive”

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune, Elpidophoros said it was important for him to visit every state and parish in the United States

In Salt Lake City, he said, there are two big parishes, “so we had to come.”

Although New York’s Greek Orthodox community is present across the country, Elpidophoros said these members have a lot in common with their brothers and sisters in Salt Lake City. Many of them have ancestors who came to the United States to pursue the American dream; they pray, go to school and participate in cultural events together.

“The church is for us always the place where we keep our identity alive”, he declared, “… [our] cultural, linguistic and religious identity.

At the same time, said Elpidophoros, each parish adapts to its state and community in different ways. That is why he wants to know first-hand the needs and expectations of each parish.

Other appointments await you

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Archbishop Elpidophoros of America and Bishop Oscar A. Solis meet at the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City on Tuesday, July 20, 2021.

This week’s historic visit to Elpidophoros comes as the Utahns mark the entry of Mormon pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley 174 years ago.

It is “a bit unprecedented” for an archbishop to visit a place for almost a week, the archbishop said. Rev. Archimandrite George Nikas, the presiding priest of the Great Salt Lake Greek Orthodox Church. “So we are very excited and very honored to have this happen.”

Throughout his visit, Elipidophoros met with a number of senior government and religious leaders.

He is scheduled to meet with Governor Spencer Cox on Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning with the ruling First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall. He is due to meet with Rep. Burgess Owens, R-Utah, on Saturday.

The Archbishop will also spend time in the Greek Orthodox churches of the Wasatch Front, including Holy Trinity Cathedral in downtown Salt Lake City, Prophet Elias in Holladay, St. Anna in Sandy, and the Church of the Transfiguration in Ogden. .

Nikas said he and other Greek Orthodox leaders in Utah would brief Elpidophoros on the community’s philanthropic work, as well as the progress of building the church’s proposed $ 300 million Greek town around the cathedral. of the Holy Trinity.

Nikas said Elpidophoros, who moved to his new post in 2019, is from Istanbul and a longtime theology professor. He made headlines last year when he attended a Black Lives Matter protest in Brooklyn.

“It is our moral duty and our obligation to defend the sanctity of every human being. We have faced a pandemic of serious physical illness, but the spiritual illness in our country runs even deeper and must be healed with actions as well as words, ”he told Greek journalist at the time. “And so, I will continue to stand on the sidelines with all those who are committed to preserving peace, justice and equality for every goodwill citizen, regardless of race, religion, gender or ethnicity. . “


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This Fox Group-designed Salt Lake City home features a sleek underground basketball court

When you think of a laundry room, what do you imagine? A dark, oversized closet, maybe – with a waste sink, if you’re lucky? The husband and wife designer duo Cara and Tom Fox, founders of The Renard Group, will not tolerate such a boring space. You will never find a part that is not both functional and beautiful in all the houses they touched.

So, in a recent project for a family in Salt Lake City, Cara Fox designed a laundry room that was both stylish and practical. “The client isn’t afraid to be girly and who she is,” says Fox. To that end, the room features Schumacher floral wallpaper, pink and white striped tiled floors, and a bespoke giant pink table with a marble top. Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. As for function: there’s an oversized farmhouse sink with a Carrara marble backsplash, as well as plenty of cabinetry.

Thanks to Fox’s impeccable attention to detail, it’s not just the sunny laundry room that has received special favor. In the kitchen, for example, Fox wanted to showcase the unique floor-to-ceiling slabs of Calacatta Gold marble that adorned the walls. Rather than covering them with cupboards, she moved most of the storage into a sleek butler’s pantry tucked away in a hallway behind the main cooking area. To boot, she created a large, bespoke room to hide the fridge and other kitchen appliances like the toaster and stand mixer. “I call it the home appliance center,” she said. “It’s super functional, but very cleverly hidden.”

Lindsay Salazar

The family, who love to host events big and small, turned to Fox to revamp several entertainment spaces in the 8,000 square foot sprawl. This includes the formal dining room, which has custom built-in storage space on either side of the fireplace and houses the client’s substantial porcelain and silverware collection. Thoughtful touches make cabinets more than just a grouping of shelves and drawers. Fox chose a revolutionary design to make the rooms more consistent with the classic Dutch colonial exterior of the mansion, and also added details like sculpted flowers that match the golden handles. An ethereal mural by local artist Tyler Huntzinger brings more nature with images of native sycamores, oaks and junipers.

As sophisticated as the residence is, it is home to four children. Fox therefore made sure that its interior would also appeal to the little ones. Good to know: One of the girls’ bedrooms, straight out of an English garden with Schumacher floral-print wallpaper and white lattice details, features a bespoke alcove bed and wardrobes and creative shelves that have room for everything from toys to shoes. “The room looks like a cohesive space,” says Fox. “You don’t really realize, ‘Oh, that’s the closet right there, and there’s the shoe storage.'”

“The client is not afraid to be girly and to be who she is”

If there’s one space in the house that perfectly combines adults’ appreciation for high-end design with children’s high energy, it’s the underground basketball court. “We thought, ‘let’s make this ground beautiful,’” says Fox. The result: a herringbone white oak courtyard. Unique? Certainly. But more importantly: the kids approve.


Cooked

cooked

Lindsay Salazar

cooked

Lindsay Salazar

“We took our inspiration from the English office cabinets and made it a specific size for everyday dishes and cups,” Fox says of the cabinets on either side of the range. Vary: Workshop with a custom walnut hood designed by The Fox Group. Wall lights: Julie Neill Lighting. Walls: Calacatta Gold marble. Brass pendant lights: Ralph Lauren with a custom shade of Schumacher Fabric. Tap: Water stone. Sink: Shaws.


Music chamber

Music chamber

Lindsay Salazar

“I think the stars of this room are the fitted wardrobes. They have a real barrel arch inside the shelves, ”says Fox. The piano is a heirloom from the client’s grandmother. Fireplace tiles: Delftiles. Integrated: Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. Couch: Customer’s own, re-upholstered in Schumacher Fabric. Slipper chairs: Phew. Low table: Phew. Chandelier: Périgold. Lattice wall: Made from custom hand cut diamond shaped boxes.


Dining room

dining room

Lindsay Salazar

The mural here, painted by Tyler Huntzinger, features Utah landscapes that guests love, from seas of trees to mountain scenes. The local artist also painted details in 24k gold on the floor and ceiling. Built-in and dining table: Customized by Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking. Chairs: Customer’s own, covered with Schumacher Fabric.


The living room

the living room

Lindsay Salazar

the living room

Lindsay Salazar

“We knew we wanted this room to have a ‘wow’ factor with the two story windows facing the pool,” says Fox. “But we softened the look with the curtains.” Curtains: Schumacher Fabric. Plants: Source by EBW design. Chandelier: Ralph Lauren. Fireplace: Made of bluish limestone. TV: Samsung, with a personalized gold frame. Couch: Customer’s own, covered with Schumacher Fabric. The couches: Customer’s own, covered with Sister parish Fabric.


Main bathroom

bedroom

Lindsay Salazar

The chic master bathroom features white paneling and bespoke vanities. Bathtub: Aqueduct. Vanities: Custom designed by The Fox Group. Mirrors: The Fox Shop.


Master bedroom

bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

For the master bedroom, “we wanted to bring that garden feel,” says Fox. “The flowers, the butterflies, the birds and all the open light.” Wallpaper: Schumacher. Curtains: Schumacher. Chairs: Customer’s own, re-upholstered in Schumacher Fabric. Bed: Custom made by The Fox Group. Sheets: Matouk. Wicker vase: Mainly baskets. Ground: White oak herringbone.


Bathroom

Bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

Although guests live in Salt Lake City, they love the East Coast. For the office powder room, Fox used a preppy nautical print to evoke this region of the United States. Vanity: Aqueduct. Mirror: The Fox Shop. Wall lights: Visual comfort. Wallpaper: Schumacher.


Laundry room

Laundry detergent

Lindsay Salazar

This area is decidedly girly. “The client is not afraid to be who she is,” says Fox. Wallpaper: Schumacher. Sink: Shaws. Board: Customized by Christopher Scott Cabinetmaking.


Girls bathroom

bathroom

Lindsay Salazar

The two girls share this bathroom, which they nicknamed “Jill and Jill”. Bathtub: Vintage Tub & Tub, with a custom color. Tile: Carrara marble. Paintings: Vintage.


Basketball court

basketball court

Lindsay Salazar

The sleek basketball court reinforces the home design game with a cool herringbone pattern. Ground: White oak.


Doll house

doll house

Lindsay Salazar

The dollhouse is huge – five feet tall! – and an exact replica of the real house, having been built from the same materials.


Butler’s Pantry

butler's pantry

Lindsay Salazar

The Butler’s Pantry features the same fabric that Jackie Kennedy used when she remodeled the White House. Curtain fabric: Schumacher. Tiles: Carrara and Bardiglio marble. Drawers: Personalized in 24 karat gold. Sink: Shaws.


Girl’s room

bedroom

Lindsay Salazar

“We wanted this room to look like a secret garden,” says Fox. Bed and built-in wardrobes: Custom designed by The Fox Group. Wallpaper: Schumacher. Pouf: Made to measure by Lee Industries. Sheets: Matouk.


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Salt Lake City Council candidate claims to be the target of politically charged vandalism

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – A candidate for Salt Lake City city council claims to be the victim of politically charged vandalism. Nigel Swaby is running to represent the residents of Salt Lake City’s Second District.

Swaby believes he is being targeted for comments he made at a city council meeting regarding police funding and developments in the neighborhood.

“Try to explain to a six-year-old why your house is painted overnight,” Swaby said.

Swaby told ABC4 he was under attack for having opinions different from others.

“I went to take my daughter to Lagoon for her birthday yesterday morning and when I stepped back, on the fence there were two spray painted slogans with my name on it,” Swaby said.

Graffiti claiming he is racist and “hates the poor” covered his fence Sunday morning.

“For someone to tell me something like that… has no basis in reality,” Swaby said.

The graffiti comes just a day after he claims to have found a tire on his lawn.

“They absolutely do not want me to be elected to city council. They think I’m a developer, I’m not… I’m a real estate agent, ”Swaby said.

Swaby is running for a seat on Salt Lake City Council. However, he said he was harassed because of what he said at city council meetings recently.

“One of the comments I made to the planning committee was that I wish it was a ‘for sale’ project instead of all these rentals that are hurting a lot of people in Salt Lake City.” , Swaby said.

He also says his take on police funding adds fuel to the fire.

“That was about a month ago when Salt Lake City was considering side hiring for its budget and I spoke up for that. I think Salt Lake City needs more cops, not fewer cops, ”Swaby said.

Swaby did not want to name the group he says is behind the vandalism.

“They are definitely part of the free speech ecosystem. But when you go from an organized protest to graffiti on the house of someone you don’t agree with, I think you’ve crossed the line, ”Swaby said.

Although he fears being targeted again, he has said he will not back down.

“It’s not going to work. I’m not going to stop running for District Two because of the paint on my fence,” Swaby said.


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Salt Lake couple cross Summit County for fundraiser from Canada to Mexico

Dean and Lorri Zenoni from Salt Lake City pose for a photo together at the Canada-U.S. Border as they begin their journey to the Mexican border as a fundraiser for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund.
Photo of Dean and Lorri Zenoni

On Thursday morning near Kremmling, a Salt Lake City cycling couple discovered the majesty of the Rocky Mountains during a 2,495-mile bike fundraiser between the Canada-US border and the southern border with Mexico.

Before retiring, U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Dean Zenoni and his wife, Lorri, started their bike ride from Kremmling to Ute Pass and up to Summit County this week, they admired the awe-inspiring orange sunrise over the low clouds and the magnificent Gore mountain range.

In the foreground were the stars and stripes of the American flag. And Dean – a veteran of four tours of Iraq as well as deployments to Somalia, Haiti, Cuba, Liberia and many other places – was sure to salute Old Glory.



For the Zenonis, this was one of the most memorable moments in 36 days after starting their June 11-August 11 hike along the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route to raise money for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund, which recently merged with the Vail Veterans Program. The fund is a veteran nonprofit charity that has provided $ 246 million in aid to more than 26,000 military personnel.

And Dean is one of them.



“On that ride you see all the farms, all the farms on the county roads with pride, everyone wearing the American flag,” Dean said. “This morning with sunrise, we passed a ranch flying both the Marine Corps and the United States flags. Seeing this dedication on the part of fellow Americans touches me.

It hits Dean because during his 24th year in the Marines he suffered a career-ending cervical spine injury after being slammed into a military vehicle in Iraq.

The injury left Dean with a ruptured disc which required surgery and caused a lot of pain as it damaged a few nerves that went to Dean’s upper chest and triceps.

With the injuries, Dean looked for a way to manage his pain and stay in touch with his service brethren. Through his connection with a battalion of wounded warriors, Dean found the fund.

Unable to lift weights as he loved before an injury, Dean was introduced by the fund to cycling as a form of healing and therapy. It’s something the 51-year-old knew he would challenge but not make his injuries worse. The Semper Fi & America’s Fund also helped Dean become a certified USA Cycling trainer, and he also used the GI Bill to go to bicycle mechanic school.

“The fund was essential for my transition,” Dean said. “I was ready to do 30 years of service. I wasn’t ready to be a civilian all of a sudden.

Dean and Lorri Zenoni of Salt Lake City pose for a photo together next to an American flag on their bike ride from the Canadian border to the Mexican border as a fundraiser for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund.
Photo of Dean and Lorri Zenoni

Over a decade after entering the fund, Dean wanted to find a way to give back to the organization that was so instrumental in his recovery while also improving his own health – hence his fundraising odyssey.

The Zenoni cycle north to south on Trek 1120 hard-tail mountain bikes with 3-inch tires. The back roads and trails of the Rocky Mountains are a far cry from the isolation at home Dean experienced last fall, which he believes motivated him to take the trip.

“I was getting bogged down and depressed a little bit last fall, and with all the COVID stuff, we had to get out of the house,” he said. “So I looked for something we could do this summer that wouldn’t be affected by any of the COVID stuff. At the beginning of December, we started to buy the bikes.

Dean and Lorri Zenoni from Salt Lake City pose for a photo together at the Continental Divide during their bike ride from the Canadian border to the Mexican border as a fundraiser for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund.
Photo of Dean and Lorri Zenoni

Lorri said she enjoys seeing the sparsely populated back roads of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and now Colorado. Another favorite memory was the ridge over Gore Pass and the fall into Radium north of Summit County for their first glimpse of Gore Canyon and the mighty Colorado River.

At 60 miles a day, the ride is grueling in places. And it will be again this weekend as the group passes through Hartsel and Salida after leaving Summit County. But the couple’s main goal is to reach their goal of $ 100,000 for the fund. Dean said he chose this number after seeing other people raise smaller donations for 5 and 10 kilometer runs.

“I haven’t counted the number of ‘K’s’ between Canada and Mexico, but there are a lot,” he said.

On Friday, including matching pledges to be added later, the couple exceeded $ 30,000.

Time will tell how much they harvest. For now, Lorri is thrilled to be getting back to soaking up the sights while riding the bike.

“Our country is so beautiful,” she said. “We have some amazing areas of the backcountry that we got to walk through that we probably would never have seen.

“And the other thing, there are some amazing people we’ve met along this trail. We have matching jerseys – red, white, and blue – for people to notice, and people to stop us and ask us what we’re doing. And then once I get a signal and get to a town, I can see there has been a donation to the page. Did someone we just met that day after stopping by and talking to us donated? We have just been overwhelmed. “

Dean and Lorri Zenoni from Salt Lake City woke up to this sight in Kremmling on Thursday, July 15, during their bike ride from the Canadian border to the Mexican border as a fundraiser for the Semper Fi & America’s Fund.
Photo of Dean and Lorri Zenoni


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Utah helps Shane Hall Band after $ 30,000 in equipment theft

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – On July 13, the San Diego-based Shane Hall Band embarked on an encore performance a few months after their first live show after the pandemic. However, what they could not have prepared for when setting up the short stay in the Salt Lake City Valley was losing the majority of their gear in the shadow of the airport. Salt Lake City International.

The Mountains & Plains Tour 2021, spreading tones of Fuzz-Funk Voodoo-Rock on the West Coast, was left mute when the group woke up on the morning of July 14. Their $ 2,000 U-Haul trailer with $ 30,000 worth of equipment inside had been stolen.

Suddenly, it was a group of musicians on tour without instruments or equipment.

“We love to visit Utah and appreciate the love we have received in return. This theft will not ruin us! said Becka Craven, the group’s manager.

According to the group, they discovered that theft around airport hotels is not necessarily uncommon. “Now learning, people are waiting in their cars for travelers who may have valuables,” they told ABC4.com.

But all was not lost, the Utahns have done what the Utahns are known for … helping those in need.

Local musicians rallied around the eleventh hour to help the band do everything to keep their promise of a few nights of good vibes, loaning guitars and gear so the Shane Hall Band wouldn’t miss a show.

“I’m going to tell you that I feel really lucky right now… and ah… I know some people would laugh about it,” Shane Hall said on stage just half a day after losing expensive office supplies. “We had our trailer stolen this morning with all our musical equipment in it and we hadn’t played any shows yet.

“We would call cops and do all that stuff, and we’d panic a little bit… and then we hit our boy Mr. Jorgenson over there and just about everything we’re making noise about right now is because from him.”

Hall continued his feelings by expressing how grateful he was that the community here is so supportive like this.

“All of the band members are full-time musicians and have to scramble to replace key items immediately and hopefully buy items back over a few weeks to maintain our livelihood,” Craven explains.

If you want to help, the group has created a gofundme.

Police Info / Trailer Info:

  • Uhaul 5 × 8 Enclosed Trailer with Wisconsin-1986ZA Plates
  • Police File Number: 21-123414.
  • Case detective: T 75.


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Salt Lake Community College and University of Utah begin construction of new campus in Herriman

The Juniper building is the first on the SLCC Herriman campus, where students can earn two- and four-year degrees from SLCC and the University of Utah.

SALT LAKE CITY, July 17, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Salt Lake City Community College and the University of Utah innovated today on a joint $ 57 million campus in Herriman. The Juniper building on the Herriman campus will provide thousands of people with academic and professional opportunities through improved access to education and training.

The Juniper Building on the new 90-acre campus will open in 2023 and make the pursuit of graduate studies more convenient for residents of fast-growing cities of Herriman, Riverton and clothier. Students will be able to earn an Associate’s Degree from SLCC and then attend the University of Utah to get a bachelor’s degree, all in one place. The campus will welcome more than 2,000 students in its first year and nearly 7,000 students by 2025.

“This partnership between SLCC and the University of Utah will help maintain the state’s high quality of life, ”said SLCC President Deneece G. Huftalin. “Education enables people to build prosperity and a bright future for themselves and their families. This new facility will play a key role in making the college more accessible to those who live in this region.

The campus will offer degrees in high demand areas including nursing, business, computing and information systems, social work, and teaching license in primary, secondary and special education. Essential student services for both schools will also be available, including admissions, counseling, disability assistance, financial assistance, transfer assistance and tutoring.

“The Juniper building at the Herriman campus arrives just in time to help meet the demand for education and employment created by the incredible growth in the southwestern region of the Salt Lake Valley,” the president said by interim of U. Michael L. Good. “The University of Utah and SLCC have worked together for a long time to support student success. We look forward to this campus paving the way for more Utahns to graduate.

Funding for the building was allocated by the Utah State Legislature in 2021, with additional support from SLCC, the University of Utah, private donors and investments in health infrastructure Herriman City. You can find more information at slcc.edu/juniper.

Salt Lake City Community College is that of Utah the largest open-access college, proudly educating the state’s most diverse student body in eight fields of study at 11 locations and online. The majority of SLCC graduates transfer to four-year institutions, and thousands more are trained in programs directly aimed at the labor market. In 2023, the institution will celebrate 75 years of teaching Utah residents in areas that contribute to the state’s vibrant economy and high quality of life.

the University of Utah is the state’s flagship higher education institution, with 18 schools and colleges, over 100 undergraduate and 90 graduate programs, and an enrollment of over 32,000 students. In 2019, the university was selected as a new member of the Association of American Universities, a prestigious, invitation-only group of 65 leading research institutes characterized by excellence in academic expertise and the impact of research, student success and obtaining resources to support missions. The U’s reputation for excellence attracts top faculty and motivated students from across the country and abroad.

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Low lake levels threaten the Great Salt Lake food chain

SALT LAKE CITY – The Great Salt Lake ecosystem – from brine shrimp and brine flies to the millions of migrating birds that live along the shore – depends on structures called microbialites. These are rocks covered with salt tolerant bacteria that live in shallow water and convert sunlight into food through photosynthesis. But they are threatened by falling lake water levels, which are approaching record lows.

“Brine flies and brine fly larvae crawl on them and eat them, and the brine shrimp will graze on them as well,” said Professor Bonnie Baxter, director of the Great Salt Lake Institute at Westminster College.

If microbials are exposed, bacterial mats can die off very quickly. And they don’t come back right away when water levels rise.

“If the lake level rises and these elements are submerged again, it takes several seasons or years for the microbes to even think about recolonizing and reforming on these structures,” said Michael Vanden Berg, head of the Energy and Energy program. Utah minerals. Geological survey.

Vanden Berg said some areas of microbials have already been exposed as the lake level has dropped. And more could be like before it hits its seasonal low in October or November.

Baxter said the lake’s ecosystem is just one reason the Utahns should be concerned about how the lake level is managed. Blowing dust off areas left dry is another.

“It’s essential for the quality of our air. It is essential for our snow. Otherwise, the dust falls on the snow and causes it to melt faster. So it’s essential for our water supply, ”she told KSL Newsradio.

Vanden Berg says it’s hard to predict what the ultimate impact of losing more microbials will be. “We are essentially in new territory,” he said.


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